Green Tea and Weight Loss

When it comes to green tea, many people drink it for its anxiolytic properties. Theanine, an amino acid found in all tea, provides these benefits. However, there is another aspect to green tea that has people’s attention: weight loss.

Green Tea for Weight Loss

Green Tea for Weight lossNot only does green tea improve longevity, numerous scientific studies now show that green tea drinkers lose weight faster than non-tea drinkers.

There are a couple of reasons for why green tea helps reduce weight. The first obvious explanation is the caffeine found in all tea. Caffeine acts as an appetite suppressant and can also induce thermogenesis. Thermogenesis is how your body generates heat and energy from your food which is how you burn calories.

However, there is another fat-fighting force at work in green tea: polyphenols, specifically catechins. Polyphenols are found in most types of tea, but green tea in particular has a very high concentration of catechins. As discovered in a study by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, catechins reduce fat accumulation as well as improve your cholesterol health.

The researchers studied a group of 35 men with similar waist circumference and BMI. The men were split into two groups, fed the same breakfast and dinner, and maintained the same overall diet in regards to calorie and fat intake. One group was given a bottle of Oolong tea fortified with a green tea extract containing 690mg of catechins, while the other group had plain Oolong tea with 22mg of catechins.

After three months the results were very telling. The group with the higher amount of catechins lost more weight and saw a greater reduction in BMI, body fat, and waist circumference. Furthermore, their bad cholesterol levels decreased.

Green Tea Extract and Weight Loss

Instant green tea powderNow all of this news is excellent. Drink more green tea and you can reap a number of rewards from increased longevity due to antioxidants to improved weight loss. However, to do so you will need to ingest a large quantity of green tea. In fact, unless you really, really like green tea obtain the necessary amount of catechins may be difficult.

This is why many people choose to supplement with green tea powder for weight loss. This powder is incredibly versatile. You can make it into green tea if you so choose by adding water or you can get creative and sprinkle the powder over various foods. You can even encapsulate your green tea powder if you prefer.

Tips for Max Weight Loss

Drinking green tea and using green tea powder are excellent ways to start your weight loss journey. Here are some additional tips for max weight loss:

  1. Start and maintain your tea drinking and supplementing routine
  2. Always keep a steady stock so you do not run out unexpectedly.
  3. Do NOT add cream or milk to your tea; this voids its weight loss benefits
  4. A healthy diet will further improve the weight loss benefits of green tea.

Should you choose to use the powder to make tea, you may find it needs some sugar. You can add sugar, or, if you are watching calories, you can use a non-calorie sweetener such as stevia instead.

To ensure maximum weight loss, you will need to start a good tea drinking and supplementing routine. As stated before, you will need a lot of green tea to reap the benefits or you can supplement to save time. Whichever route you take, you will need to stick to it.

Make sure you have your necessary supplies on hand so you don’t run out accidently. You could also try setting a specific tea time for your day to relax and unwind or use it to replace your morning coffee. Another good way to naturally incorporate green tea into your diet is to drink it with lunch and dinner in place of soda.

Warm tea can also satisfy the afternoon munchies because of its EGCG content. EGCG helps lower glucose which directly reduces cravings. Finally, do not add cream or milk to your tea. While this is a popular method of tea consumption for the Brits, it does not help with weight loss.

Additional Tips

Green tea with lemonWhile drinking green tea boosts weight loss, a healthy diet will produce greater results in a shorter amount of time. Also, try out new tea flavors from time to time or add a slice of lemon to enhance your green tea. By mixing it up from time to time you can help ensure you do not get bored and abandon your new healthy habits.

Source

  1. Nagao, T. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 2005; vol 81: 122-129

Is Tea an Effective Way to Reduce Stress Levels?

tea as a stress reducerThere is no shortage of stressors in the world today. Professionally, everyone is pushed to do more in the same amount of time and personal conditions aren’t much different.

The unfortunate thing about stress is that it compounds with stress begetting even more stress. The cycle can be difficult to break, especially if you don’t have a plan for stress management.

There are many ways to manage stress. While it’s often recommended that you get enough exercise or take more breaks, supplements are often overlooked as a way to moderate stress levels. Stress can be reduced with basic, easily-available supplements too.

In fact, research shows that supplementing with something you probably already have in your kitchen can help lower stress levels. What is this magical stress buster? Tea.
Continue reading “Is Tea an Effective Way to Reduce Stress Levels?”

Theanine and Inositol Combo for Anxiety

Everyone has experienced feelings of anxiety from time to time in their lives. For some it can be a crippling disorder that prevents us from living a happy and meaningful life, inducing panic attacks and intense bouts of worrying and fear. For others it may only be a fleeting feeling of tenseness or being on edge that won’t seem to go away no matter what you do. If you think you have tried it all I urge you to read on and discover the anxiety curbing effects that the combination of theanine and inositol can produce.

What is Theanine?worry-free supplements

Theanine is an amino acid that is commonly found in tea and to be more specific it can be found in high amounts in green tea. It is also available as an oral dietary supplement. It is commonly used as a nootropic in combination with caffeine as it produces a synergistic effect. In a number of double blind placebo controlled studies research has shown that supplementing theanine can have a direct influence on brain activity, reducing stress and relaxing the mind without causing drowsiness. In other studies, theanine benefits include improved memory and cognitive function as well as (ding ding!) reducing anxiety. To top it all off there are little to no side-effects that have been discovered from the result of supplementing theanine; even at the highest doses recorded. Therefore we can conclude the use of theanine is a viable option as a standalone anti-anxiety supplement, but we aren’t stopping there.

Inositol for Anxiety

So, what is inositol? Inositol is a chemical compound that is found in many foods; in particular fruit, especially cantaloupe and oranges. Inositol is created in your body when the phytic acid that is found naturally in foods such as seeds, nuts, legumes and whole grains interact with the bacteria in your digestive system. With its own mountain of research behind it inositol has been shown to reduce the frequency and severity of disorders that may stem from high levels of anxiety including panic attacks and mood disorders. In one double blind placebo controlled study researchers looked at subjects with lower than normal levels of inositol and administered doses accordingly, the results concluded that inositol supplementation was synonymous with lowered levels of depression and ultimately anxiety. Through the combination of these two supplements we can see the potential for a lowered overall state of anxiety.

Theanine and Inositol Dosage for Anxiety

As with all supplements it is important to find the correct dosage and to implement the supplement safely into your routine. Dosage amounts for theanine should be based on personal response but as always refer to your packaging for more information, a safe bet would to be stay under the 1000mg mark. As for inositol dosage, research has shown that 18g per day is safe but when combining with other supplements dosage should always be based off your personal response, as always refer to your products label for more information.

Sources

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7726322
  2. Kimura K, Ozeki M, Juneja LR, et al. l-Theanine reduces psychological and physiological stress responses. Biol Psychol. 2006 Aug 21
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7416064

Green Tea for Anxiety

Green tea derives from a tea plant that is native to Asia and is called camellia sinensis. It is also the same plant that is the source of black tea. However, green tea is different not because of the plant that is used to make the tea but because it is processed in a different way compared to other teas. Green tea is also the least processed out of all of the other commercial teas and the method used helps to preserve more of the nutrients and health benefits that come with the tea. Green tea has been used for thousands of years in both Japan and China and has a good reputation for providing some great and effective health benefits including helping with anxiety by providing calming effects.

Try Green Tea for Anxiety ReliefGreen Tea Supplements for Anxiety

Green tea extract is another more concentrated form of green tea which is associated with a variety of different health benefits many of which are supported by scientific research. What is green tea extract? Essentially it is a more concentrated and nutritional form of green tea. Green tea extract acts as a powerful antioxidant that protects the body from damaging effects of free radicals. Green tea has been used for therapeutic purposes for a long time. It is made by steaming the leaves lightly and then allowing them to dry which helps to retain the properties and nutrients of the plant. Oolong tea is made by allowing the leaves to ferment slightly before drying and black tea is made by allowing the leaves to ferment for a little bit longer. Fermentation breaks down the active ingredients in the tea making the green tea or the extract.

Green tea extract is standardized in the production phase which means that it will be guaranteed that a certain percentage of the active ingredients remain present in the green tea extract capsules. Benefits of green tea extract include helping to aid in weight loss, lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, promoting oral health, helping the body fight viruses, reducing inflammation, fighting infection, promoting immune health, and slowing the aging process. Pure green tea extract is generally what you will want to look for if you want to get the maximum benefits of green tea extract.

Many people believe that green tea extract has curative effects because recent studies have indicated that the antioxidants that green tea contains help strengthen the immune system and boost health. Additionally green tea has been used for anxiety for quite some time and according to reviews has had some promising effects. Many people report that green tea extract has a calming effect on them and helps to calm their anxiety. Although green tea is not particularly known for its anti-anxiety effects it can be quite effect and especially when it is combined with L-theanine. So overall green tea is great for health but its effectiveness on anxiety is minimal at best but in some people can be a good for anxiety. However, in some cases people have actually reported that green tea increased their anxiety so you may want to watch out if that is the case for you and stop taking green tea immediately. Green tea can be purchased on drugstore.com, at Wal-Mart, vitamin shops and Amazon.

Green Tea Dosage for Anxiety

The recommended dosage of green tea extract is 350mg daily. To achieve maximum anxiety relief benefits, try adding l-theanine to green tea extract to counteract any side effects experienced from caffeine.

Sources:

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18468736
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21303262
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326618